Home

About

Contacts


Papers

Author

Area

Search


AAP Home

SCWP

 

Area: Ancient Philosophy

| Kuykendall | Nussbaum |


Kuykendall, E.

Kuykendall,# E. (1989) Introduction to ‘Sorcerer Love’, by Luce Irigaray. Hypatia 3 (3): 28- 32.

Kw: Platonic love; love; Irigaray; Plato

Introduces the paper by Luce Irigaray titled 'Sorcerer Love.' Sorcerer Love as name given by Irigaray to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's 'Symposium'; Argument that Socrates attributed two incompatible positions to the character Diotima.


Nussbaum, M.

Nussbaum,# M. C.  (2009). The Therapy of Desire: Theory and Practice in Hellenistic Ethics.  Princeton University Press.

Kw: Stoics; Epicureans; moral and political thought

"The Epicureans, Skeptics, and Stoics practiced philosophy not as a detached intellectual discipline, but as a worldly art of grappling with issues of daily and urgent human significance: the fear of death, love and sexuality, anger and aggression. Like medicine, philosophy to them was a rigorous science aimed both at understanding and at producing the flourishing of human life. In this engaging book, Martha Nussbaum examines texts of philosophers committed to a therapeutic paradigm - including Epicurus, Lucretius, Sextus Empiricus, Chrysippus, and Seneca - and recovers a valuable source for our moral and political thought of today.The Epicureans, Skeptics, and Stoics practiced philosophy not as a detached intellectual discipline, but as a worldly art of grappling with issues of daily and urgent human significance: the fear of death, love and sexuality, anger and aggression. Like medicine, philosophy to them was a rigorous science aimed both at understanding and at producing the flourishing of human life. In this engaging book, Martha Nussbaum examines texts of philosophers committed to a therapeutic paradigm--including Epicurus, Lucretius, Sextus Empiricus, Chrysippus, and Seneca--and recovers a valuable source for our moral and political thought of today."
(book overview)


Nussbaum,# M. C. (2001) The Fragility of Goodness; Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.

Kw: Tragedy; moral luck

This book is a study of ancient views about 'moral luck'. It examines the fundamental ethical problem that many of the valued constituents of a well-lived life are vulnerable to factors outside a person's control, and asks how this affects our appraisal of persons and their lives. The Greeks made a profound contribution to these questions, yet neither the problems nor the Greek views of them have received the attention they deserve. This book thus recovers a central dimension of Greek thought and addresses major issues in contemporary ethical theory. One of its most original aspects is its interrelated treatment of both literary and philosophical texts. The Fragility of Goodness has proven to be important reading for philosophers and classicists, and its non-technical style makes it accessible to any educated person interested in the difficult problems it tackles. This new edition features an entirely new preface by Martha Nussbaum.
(book overview)


Nussbaum,# M. C. (1994). Serpents in the Soul: A Reading of Seneca’s Medea. In M. Nussbaum Hellenistic Ethics Princeton University Press: Princeton: Chapter 12.

Kw: Stoics; Epicureans; desire; epistemology; Hellenism

Abstract not located


Nussbaum,# M. C. (1992). Tragedy and Self-sufficiency: Plato and Aristotle on Fear and Pity. In A. Rorty (ed.) Essays on Aristotle’s Poetics Princeton University Press: Princeton: 261- 190 or J. Annas (ed.) Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Vol X: 1992.

Kw: Aristotle; Plato

Abstract not located


Nussbaum,# M. C. (1989). Mortal Immortals: Lucretius on Death and the Voice of Nature.  Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50: 303–51.

Kw: Stoics; Epicureans; ancient; death; metaphysics; nature

Epicurius writes:”The correct recognition that death is nothing to us makes the mortality of life enjoyable, not by adding on an infinite time, but by removing the longing for immortality” (LM 132).

But Nikidion might think incorrectly. For she might, as often happens, take a walk at dawn in the early spring. She might feel the knifelike beauty of the morning. Watch the light rise behind white blossoms, until they flash like brief stars. See leaves half unrolled, translucent, their sharp green still untouched by life; the sun striking sparkles on the moving surface of a stream. And she would listen, then, in the silence to the sweet and deadly music of time...
(First Paragraph)